Safety Tips

 

General Safety Precautions around the Home

  • Always ensure that your doors and windows are locked and secure especially at night. But remember crime doesn’t always happen at night, day time crime is on the rise too.
  • If you’re leaving a door open, make sure that the security gate is locked and the key removed to a secure place.
  • Security  or motion sensor lights around a house help protect you by promoting visibility. You should also be aware of any possible blind spots or shadows in your yard.
  • Ensure that you are not visible to anyone outside your house when darkness falls and the lights are on. This will only serve to highlight your movements throughout your home.
  • Try to reduce foliage and bushes in the vicinity of your driveway as these act as good hiding places for would-be criminals.
  • Have your alarms serviced regularly and do test’s.
  • Develop a family emergency plan and ensure that everyone on the property knows what to do in the event of an emergency, whether a criminal, medical or fire emergency.
  • Ensure that any tools or objects that can serve as weapons, e.g. spades, axes, picks, etc, are locked away when not in use.
  • Dogs are useful as deterrents and many home owners prefer to let them sleep in the house at night for protection.
  • Always keep a torch nearby and check the batteries regularly.
  • Keep emergency numbers close to hand.
  • Maintain a good relationship with your neighbours. They can keep an eye on your house when you are away, particularly on a week-long holiday or weekend. They can also report suspicious activity or anything unusual.
  • Do regular spot checks on your walls,fencing,gates and entrances to see nothing has been tampered with.
  • If you arrive home and find something suspicious, do not enter your home. Rather call the police, your armed response company or a neighbour to help you in checking your home.
  • Inform your domestic workers to be more aware when they are home alone. Inform them not to leave doors open when they are working in another part of the house.
  • Ask for identification if somebody comes to your door or gate and presents himself as a municipal, Eskom, water meter or SAPS official. Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you are unsure of who they are.
  • Be cautious when employing someone without a reference. This is particularly valid for casual employees.
  • Join your neighbourhood watch and be an active part of your community safety.

 

Things Your Burglar Won’t Tell You

 

  • Sometimes, I carry a clipboard. Sometimes, I dress like a lawn guy and carry a rake. I do my best to never, ever look like a crook.
  • Of course I look familiar. I was here just last week cleaning your carpets, painting your walls, or delivering your new refrigerator.
  • Hey, thanks for letting me use the bathroom quickly last time, while I was in there, I unlatched the back window to make my return a little easier.
  • Love those flowers. That tells me you have taste … and taste means there are nice things inside. Those yard toys your kids leave out always make me wonder what type of gaming system they have.
  • Yes, I really do look for newspapers piled up on the driveway. And I might leave a pizza flyer in your front door to see how long it takes you to remove it.
  • If decorative glass is part of your front entrance, don’t let your alarm company install the control pad where I can see if it’s set. That just makes it too easy.
  • A good security company alarms the window over the sink. And the windows on the second floor, if you have one, which often access the master bedroom and your jewellery.
  • It’s raining, you’re fumbling with your umbrella, and you forget to lock your door-understandable. But understand this: I don’t take a day off because of bad weather.
  • I always knock first. If you answer, I’ll ask for directions somewhere or offer to clean your gutters. [Don’t take me up on it.] Its just to test to see if you are actually there.
  • Do you really think I won’t look in your sock drawer? I always check dresser drawers, the bedside table,  under the mattress , in pillow’s, medicine cabinet and yes the washing basket too.
  • Helpful hint: I almost never go into kids’ rooms.
  • You’re right: I won’t have enough time to break into that safe where you keep your valuables. But if it’s not bolted down, I’ll take it with me.
  • A loud TV or radio can be a better deterrent than the best alarm system. If you’re reluctant to leave your TV on while you’re out of town, you can buy a device that works on a timer and simulates the flickering glow of a real television..
  • The two things I hate most: loud dogs and nosy neighbours, most of the time its easier to choose another house.
  • I’ll break a window to get in, even if it makes a little noise. If your neighbour hears one loud sound, he’ll stop what he’s doing and wait to hear it again. If he doesn’t hear it again, he’ll just go back to what he was doing. It’s human nature.
  • I’m not complaining, but why would you pay all that money for a fancy alarm system and leave your house without setting it?
  • I love looking in your windows as I walk past, I’m looking for signs that you’re home, and for flat screen TVs or gaming systems I’d like. I’ll drive or walk through your neighbourhood at night, before you close the blinds, just to pick my targets. If I knock at the door and ask you a question I will look over your shoulder.
  • Avoid announcing your vacation on your social networking site. It’s easier than you think to look up your address.
  • To you, leaving that window open just a crack during the day is a way to let in a little fresh air. To me, it’s an invitation.